Pittsburgh’s Andy Warhol Museum Offers an Eclectic Experience

SHARE
,

andy warhol

At the Andy Warhol Museum there is a lot to see and do. The museum covers seven floors and contains more than 9,000 items.

Warhol first shook up the art world with his now famous Campbell soup cans. They put him in the spotlight.

“And also raised a lot of controversy of what art is, what art could be, can art be an everyday object,” said Nicole Dezelon, museum spokesperson.

Warhol also gained wide attention for his work in silk screen, when he developed a process called under painting.

“It was a really genius idea, this is how he created all of his pop portraits,” said Dezelon.

He did many famous faces from Hollywood to world leaders and even his mother. Warhol is considered the Godfather of pop art. He also was among the first to exhibit video as an art form and made dozens of his own films.

“In our film and video gallery you can see over 100 of Warhol’s films,” Dezelon said.

To find subjects for his films, Warhol would conduct his own screen tests in his studio. His camera and lights are here, and you can do your own screen test and have it e-mailed to you.

Another galley features one of Warhol’s many ventures into installation art, it’s called the silver cloud room.

According to Dezelon, “That started during a period of art called experiments in art and technology and what that did was link artists with engineers or scientists to help them realize an art work,” according to Dezelon.

Warhol also became known for art on a large scale. His silk screen of Marlon Brando is one example that is here, and his “Last Supper” covers an entire wall in the museum.

Another curious museum feature is Warhol’s time capsules. More than 600 cardboard boxes which each represent objects or writings from one day in Warhol’s life.

“He would pack them up, date them, and then ship them off to storage,” said Dezelon.

The museum is documenting the contents of each box.

Moving from the top floor down, the museum covers Warhol’s whole life.

“You get a vast overview of his life growing up in Pittsburgh as well as what his artistic process and practice was like through out his life,” Dezelon said.

Parking at the museum is no problem. It has a designated lot. Just look for the large Brillo box.

Source

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

I Love Warhol

I Love Warhol